5 Books on Hostile Work Environments

April 16, 2016

As you already know, I endured a hostile work environment. Now I’m writing about it. But the following books may give you insight into what you are enduring. Here are the following:

  1. Ten Commandments of Working in a Hostile Environment by T.D. Jakes
  2. What Your Boss Really Wants From You: 15 Insights To Improve Your Relationship by Steve Arneson.
  3. Women And Sexual Harassment: A Practical Guide to the Legal Protections of Title VII and the Hostile Environment Claim by Robert C. Berring and Anja A. Chan
  4. Sexual Harassment Kit by Bikash Kalita
  5. The Manager’s Guide to Preventing a Hostile Work Environment: How to Avoid Legal Threats by Protecting Your Workplace from Harassment Based on Sex, Race Age by Wanda Dobrich, PhD., Steven Dranoff, PhD., Gerald L. Maatman Jr., Esq. (I mention this book because you will notice immediately what your boss is not doing)

Wipe your tears. Diffuse your anger, and get informed! Always leave a paper trail. In my case, I left a trail of emails. Now, the employer may claim that you are harassing them with emails if you consistently report harassment that way. Tough! It may be the only way to prove you’ve notified the company, the chain of command.

Because you have complained in person–or even given your supervisor a heads up, you’ve planted a target on your back because now the company must cover its ass. The company will look for any reason to discipline you. This is called retaliation. Firing you is not only wrongful termination but continuous retaliation.

In my case, BWC secretly interviewed my neighbors about me. Two of them told me! Ignorant of what to do, I did nothing about it. When I saw someone stealing my trash out of my trashcan, I reported it to police. But nothing materialized from the incident. Watch your trash! Companies hire private investigators to go through it. Even if you use a shredder, private investigators will still fish for information.

For all of this, the EEOC  nor the OCRC never helped me. The agency’s investigators were too busy trying to drive me crazy, and they missed out on obvious opportunities to close this case in my favor. Know this: After filing a workplace violation charge, you can’t trust anyone but yourself. The investigation lingers for as long as your family, friends and neighbors cooperate. You must stop the investigation by blasting what happened while appearing calm, cool, and collected. I know. I’m a survivor.

Follow me. Stick with me. Share my blog posts. Tell people about it. And if you have a similar story, I may let you guest blog. Contact me at: tracey.lampley@gmail.com. Until the next time . . .

Tracey Lampley is the author of Kept and Kept Book Two
Follow me on twitter @BookMistress1

 

 

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